The Green Medium is an Emerald Award-winning, youth-run blog that seeks to innovate how we discuss and inform ourselves on environmental concerns.

How One Book Changed The World: A Lesson from Enviro-History

How One Book Changed The World: A Lesson from Enviro-History

Living in the present, we have the gift of hind-sight; we can see the full course of history and how things have shaped our world. From such a vantage point, we can become prone to think that certain things were inevitable, that our world was simply meant to be. This is a fallacy of course. History is nothing more than a string of unpredictable events, with the final outcome unknown to those involved. Such is the case with the story of Rachel Carson and her seminal book, Silent Spring. It seems clear to us today that Carson’s book on DDT was destined to change the world, but this was simply not the case back in 1962. When Carson published Silent Spring, there was no way she could have known the impact her book would have; Carson could not have predicted her work would spark a movement and lead to the creation of the EPA. This is something we need to remain mindful of here in the present. As Carson’s story illustrates, history is never set in stone, and we must remember that our small, conscious actions today can have outcomes far greater than we can foresee.

Rachel Carson’s Story

Rachel Carson was born in 1907 in Springdale, a small industrial town in Pennsylvania. Years before she would change the world, Carson was a science writer and editor for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, publishing several books and articles about nature and the ocean. Through her work as a nature writer, Carson became something of a household name in the 1940’s and 50’s.

Silent Spring in its First Edition (1962)

Silent Spring in its First Edition (1962)

Silent Spring & The Dangers of DDT

As Carson’s own popularity as an author was rising, the popularity of the pesticide DDT, or Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (what a mouthful!), was also rising. When DDT was made available to the general public in 1945, it soon became a favourite among farmers because of its utter effectiveness. However, while DDT was extremely useful against crop-ruining insects, it was also devastating for other bugs and especially birds. As Carson helped to show through Silent Spring, DDT is toxic to a range of animals, including eagles, falcons, shrimp and other kinds of fish. It is even poisonous and carcinogenic for humans. While this was already well-known to scientists by the 1960s, it would take an effective science communicator like Carson to bring these disturbing facts into the public consciousness.

With her landmark book on DDT, Carson thrust not only pesticides but environmental issues in general into the public conversation like never before. For the first time, the idea that human industry, human progress really, could be bad for the environment became widely understood and accepted by the average person. We must remember that this was not common knowledge before the early 1960s.

While Carson initially faced backlash over Silent Spring, especially from the powerful chemical industry, her years of exhaustive study would ultimately face up to scrutiny. In 1972, her hard work finally paid off; DDT was outright banned in the United States. However, Carson did not live to see the ban enacted; she had, tragically, died of breast cancer in 1964.

The Legacy of Silent Spring

As with many great writers, Carson’s work outlived her and, ultimately, left a legacy of its own. Silent Spring undeniably changed the course of history, namely by sparking the modern environmental movement. Carson’s work opened the door for so many future organizations and movements, from the Environmental Protection Agency to the grass-roots group Extinction Rebellion. This is the great legacy of Silent Spring, a legacy Carson could not have foreseen back in the early 1960s.

As environmentalists, we owe a lot to Rachel Carson, and we must remember what her story teaches us. If there is one big lesson we must take away, it’s this: we can not know how our seemingly small actions today will impact the future in profound ways. When Carson sat down to write Silent Spring in the mid-1950s, she was initially hesitant, thinking that she was a nature writer and not an investigative reporter. But her love of nature and its beauty ultimately pushed her to do it, and our world today is far better for it.

We must not forget Carson’s story. A better, greener world is possible and we have to fight for it, even when the path forward is still unclear.

Climate Change & The Collapse of Civilizations: A Lesson from Enviro-History

Climate Change & The Collapse of Civilizations: A Lesson from Enviro-History

Three Lessons from Environmental History: An Introduction

Three Lessons from Environmental History: An Introduction